“At one point I was considering becoming a monk but turning into a photographer seemed to be a more realistic idea.”


By Niall McArdle

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Hungarian photographer Adam Magyar feels that the only way to cope with the sometimes stifling modern world is to slow it down. Way down. He shoots video of densely-crowded public spaces, then slows the images down to hypnotic speed. The opposite of this famous examination of how we live. The results are beautiful, magical slices of urban flow. Urban Flow is in fact the title of one of his series: photos taken with a slit-scan camera that captures one line of pixels at a time, up to 8000 lines per second.

As Magyar says, “I’m speaking about very simple things. I’m a backpacker I’ve been travelling a lot. I’ve spent years in Asia, mainly India. At one point I was considering becoming a monk but turning into a photographer seemed to be a more realistic idea. I’ve always been intrigued by transciency, our temporary existence, the drama of coming in and going out of the world as we know it. The flow of existence and human lives being overlapping chapters in it. I wanted to depict people as being particles in a system all heading in the same direction.”

train2_allframes_256_99_11_600w_-04fpsMagyar addressed the TED Salon in Berlin recently. You can see the video here.

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2 thoughts on ““At one point I was considering becoming a monk but turning into a photographer seemed to be a more realistic idea.”

  1. Really good Niall. You notice so much more at this speed. Greater detail, emotions expressed, and there is a tangible sense of actually being there. Thanks for bringing him to my attention.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Like

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